Degree Requirements

The requirements for an undergraduate degree at Lehman College are those in effect during the student's first semester of matriculation, with the exception that, as of the 1996 fall semester, the number of credits required to earn a degree is 120 for all students, provided all other requirements have been satisfied.

College Preparatory Initiative

The Board of Trustees in Fall 1993 promulgated new course requirements that students must complete in high school. Requirements apply to all students who graduated from high school in Spring 1993 and thereafter and to all students completing a GED diploma in September 1993 and thereafter. As of Fall 1999, students entering a senior college are expected to have sixteen academic units: four units in English, three units in mathematics, two units in laboratory sciences, four units in social sciences, two units in languages other than English, and one unit in fine arts. All transfer students who graduated from high school in Spring 1993 and thereafter, or received GED diplomas in September 1993 and after, will need to document completion of the CPI (College Preparatory Initiative) academic requirements by submitting an official copy of the high school transcript and/or GED scores.

All students who have not satisfied these requirements prior to admission will be required to complete them before their graduation from Lehman College. Students should consult with an adviser in the Academic Information and Advisement Center (Shuster Hall, Room 280) for information regarding courses approved for fulfilling CPI deficiencies.

Basic Skills Proficiency

The Board of Trustees of The City University of New York has mandated that every student meet a minimum University-wide level of proficiency in reading, writing, and mathematics before entering the senior college. Lehman College administers the CUNY/ACT Reading and Writing Assessment Tests and the CUNY Mathematics Assessment Test (MAT) to all students after admission to the College, but prior to beginning classes, to determine whether the students meet minimum University and College standards.

Students who fail either the CUNY/ACT Reading and/or Writing Assessment Tests or the CUNY Mathematics Assessment Test may be invited to enter a "Prelude to Success" program offered at Bronx Community College.

Program in English as a Second Language

Students whose native language is not English and who have failed the CUNY Reading and/or Writing Assessment Test are administered an ESL Placement Test and placed in the ESL sequence. (For a detailed description of ESL courses, see the information contained under "Academic Departments and Programs" later on in this Bulletin.)

Students in the ESL program will be expected to pass one level of the program for each semester of attendance at the College. Students who receive the grade of NC* in an ESL course the first time will be placed on skills probation. Students who receive a second grade of NC* in the same level will be dropped from the College. Any student who is dropped will be given the opportunity to appeal.

NOTE: City University policy requires that ESL students at the senior colleges pass CUNY/ACT reading and writing assessment tests prior to entering the freshman composition sequence.
 
*See "Grading Systems." Grades of WU in ESL courses will be handled in the same manner as grades of NC.

Credit Requirements

To earn a bachelor's degree at Lehman College, students must earn a minimum of 120 credits. All students must complete at least thirty credits in residence at Lehman, including at least half of the credits of their chosen major and minor (if required). Credits in residence are defined as credits earned in Lehman College course work.

NOTE: Transfer students should have their transcripts evaluated as soon as possible. First, the Office of Admissions (Shuster Hall, Room 152) will evaluate transfer credits to determine their Lehman equivalents. Second, the Office of Academic Standards and Evaluation (Shuster Hall, Room 280) will determine which Lehman degree requirements have been met. Third, the academic department that houses the student's major (and minor, if needed) will determine which of these requirements have been met. Students who transfer directly from a CUNY or SUNY community college on completion of an A.A., A.S., or an A.A.S. degree will have satisfied the lower-division General Education Requirements of Lehman College. Such students must still satisfy the upper-division General Education Requirements and meet the New York State minimum liberal arts credit requirement as determined by the Office of Academic Standards and Evaluation.

Lower Division General Education Requirements (38-50 Credits)

The Undergraduate General Education Curriculum

General Education Courses

Coordinator of General Education, Robert Whittaker (Carman Hall, Room 337)

Lehman College provides undergraduates with not only a major specialization but also training in a range of basic skills and general subjects on beginning, intermediate, and advanced levels. In this way, a bachelor's degree represents both training in a special field and the skills and knowledge to meet life's varied challenges responsibly, intelligently, and creatively.

General Education includes subjects comprising the shared intellectual heritage of our diverse culture. It teaches critical thinking and encourages accurate and effective communication. General Education supports the integration, synthesis, and application of knowledge, and includes proficiency in information literacy. Undergraduate education offers not only specialized knowledge and professional skills but also the multiple views and general intellectual abilities developed by the study of liberal arts and sciences that provide a foundation for independent, responsible living.

For a list of the General Education courses in individual disciplines and departments, see "Distribution Requirement."

College Writing Requirement (3-6 Credits)

Unless exempted, all students must successfully complete a six-credit sequence in English composition (ENG 110-ENG 120). Every student should enroll in the appropriate English composition course each semester until ENG 120 is passed.

All entering freshmen and all transfer students who have not already done so must take the CUNY/A.C.T. Writing and Reading Assessment Tests prior to registering for their first semester at the College. Students will be placed in the appropriate composition course or English as a Second Language course. A student may be exempted from ENG 110 on the basis of an evaluation made by the English Department.

Students who enter Lehman College with transfer credit in English composition must consult the Department of English regarding their composition requirement. Except for holders of A.A., A.S., and A.A.S. degrees from CUNY or SUNY, transfer students may be required to take a placement exam. Eligible students should take the C.P.E. at special sessions prior to, or at the time of, their first registration at the College. Composition placement or exemption will be determined following the evaluation.

Foreign Language Requirement (3-9 Credits)

Students with no more than one year of high school credit in a foreign language are required to take a sequence of two language courses for nine credits at the 100 level or the equivalent three-course sequence for nine credits.

Students with more than one year of high school credit in a foreign language may fulfill the requirement with one of the following options:

  1. According to placement by the appropriate language department, either:
    • successfully complete one 200- or 300-level foreign language course;
    • successfully complete the final course of a 100-level sequence; or
    • successfully complete a sequence of two courses for a total of nine credits at the 100 level in a new language, or the equivalent three-course sequence.
  2. Students for whom English is a second language may fulfill the requirement by:
    • successfully completing two courses in ESL at the ESL 103 level or above;
    • after placement by the appropriate language department, successfully completing one course at the 200 or 300 level in the native language; or
    • successfully completing two courses for a total of 9 credits in a new language at the 100 level, or the equivalent three-course sequence.
  3. Transfer students who have completed a year of foreign language study at the college level have satisfied the language requirement.

Natural Science Requirement (8-10 Credits)

All students are required to successfully complete two courses in laboratory science from a specified list. The list of approved courses is available from the Academic Information and Advisement Center (Shuster Hall, Room 280) and in the Schedule of Classes distributed prior to registration each semester. The following list is approved for the Fall 2011 semester, and may change for subsequent semesters:

Credits
ANT 171Introduction to Human Evolution

4

ANT 269Introduction to Human Variation

4

AST 117Astronomy of Stellar Systems

4

AST 136Astronomy of the Solar System

4

BIO 166Principles of Biology: Cells and Genes

4

BIO 167Principles of Biology: Organisms

4

BIO 183Human Biology

4

BIO 184Plants and People

4

 

CHE 114Essentials of General Chemistry Lecture

3

And

CHE 115Essentials of General Chemistry Laboratory

1.5

 

CHE 136Elements of Chemistry

4

 

CHE 166General Chemistry I

4

And

CHE 167General Chemistry Laboratory I

1.5

 

GEP 228Weather and Climate

3

GEO 101Dynamic Earth

3

GEO 166Processes of Global Change

4

GEO 167Earth Evolution

3

PHY 135Fundamental Concepts and Methods of Physics

4

PHY 140The Physics of Sound

3.5

NOTE: Students who are required to take BIO 181: Anatomy and Physiology I, BIO 182: Anatomy and Physiology II, CHE 114/CHE 115: Essentials of General Chemistry Lecture and Laboratory, orCHE 120/CHE 121: Essentials of Organic Chemistry--Lecture and Laboratory as part of their majors (Dietetics, Foods, and Nutrition; Health Education and Promotion; Nursing) may use these courses as substitutes for the Natural Science requirement. Students entering the Biology, Chemistry, Anthropology/Biology/Chemistry, and Physics majors as well as premedical, predental, prepharmacy, and preveterinary program students, may use PHY 166, PHY 167, PHY 168, and PHY 169 to fulfill this requirement.

Mathematics Requirement (3-4 Credits)

Unless exempted, all students are required to successfully complete one three- or four-credit college-level mathematics course numbered 125 or higher, or three one-credit mathematics courses numbered between 180 and 199.

Distribution Requirement (21 Credits)

Every student must choose and complete successfully one course from a specified list in each of the seven areas listed below. The list of approved courses is available at the Academic Information and Advisement Center (Shuster Hall, Room 280) and in the Schedule of Classes, distributed prior to registration each semester. (The list of Distribution Courses is approved each year. The following list is approved for the Fall 2011 semester and may change for subsequent semesters.) No more than two courses from the same department may be used to satisfy the Distribution Requirement.

Area I: Individuals and Society (3 credits)

Credits
AAS 239Black Women in American Society

3

ANT 206Anthropological Perspectives onWomen and Men

3

LAC 231Latinos in the United States

3

LAC 232Family and Gender Relations Among Latinos

3

LNG 150The Phenomena of Language

3

POL 217Criminal Justice

3

POL 230Immigration and Citizenship

3

PSY 166General Psychology

3

SOC 166Fundamentals of Sociology

3

Area II: Socio-Political Structures (3 credits)

Credits
AAS 166Introduction to African and African American Studies

3

AAS 225The Contemporary Urban Community

3

AAS 248African History

3

ANT 211Cultural Anthropology

3

ECO 166Introduction to Macroeconomics

3

GEH 101An Introduction to Geography

3

GEH 235Conservation of the Environment

3

GEP 204Basic Mapping: Applications and Analysis

3

POL 150Contemporary Political Issues

3

POL 166The American Political System

3

POL 211Public Policy

3

Area III: Literature (3 credits)

Credits
AAS 241Literature of the English & Francophone Caribbean

3

AAS 242African Literature

3

AAS 267African-American Literature

3

ENG 222Literary Genres

3

ENG 223English Literature

3

ENG 226Shakespeare

3

ENG 227American Literature

3

ENG 229Contemporary Urban Writers

3

ENG 234Women in Literature

3

ENG 260Multicultural American Literatures

3

FRE 232The Francophone World (In Translation)

3

IDW 211Classics of the Western World: Ancient and Medieval

3

IDW 212Classics of the Western World II: Renaissance and Modern

3

IDW 213Classics of the Asian World

3

LAC 214Literature of the Caribbean

3

SPA 233Latin American Literature in Translation

3

ENG 300Introduction to Literary Study

4

FRE 232: In translation.

ENG 300: Fulfills Area III requirement for English majors in the ECCE certification sequence

Area IV: The Arts (3 credits)

Credits
AAS 266Contemporary Black Music

3

ARH 135Introduction to the History of Asian Art-Islamic, Buddhist, and Hindu Cultures

3

ARH 137Introduction to the History of Non-Western Art

3

ARH 141Introd to the History of Modern Art of the 19th & 20th Centuries in Europe & the US

3

ARH 167Tradition and Innovation in the Art of the West

3

ART 109Observation and the Visual Experience

3

ART 110Elements of Visual Communication

3

DNC 235Dance Perspectives

3

HUM 250The City and the Theatre

3

MSH 114Introduction to Music

3

THE 241The Art of the Theatre

3

THE 243Queer Theatre

3

Area V: Comparative Culture (3 credits)

Credits
AAS 232African Civilizations

3

AAS 235Caribbean Societies

3

AAS 240Women in African Society

3

ANT 210Women in Latin America

3

ANT 230Selected Studies in Societies and Cultures (Africa)

3

ANT 231Selected Studies in Societies and Cultures: Middle East

3

ANT 232Selected Studies in Societies and Cultures (Europe)

3

ANT 233Selected Studies in Societies and Cultures (India)

3

ANT 234Selected Studies in Societies and Cultures (Oceania)

3

ANT 235Selected Studies in Societies and Cultures (Native North America)

3

ANT 236Selected Studies in Societies and Cultures (Southeast Asia)

3

ANT 237Selected Studies in Societies and Cultures (East Asia)

3

LAC 238Selected Studies in Societies and Cultures (Latin America)

3

GEH 240Urban Geography

3

HIS 240East Asian Civilization

3

HIS 249Islamic Civilization

3

IAS 250The Italian-American Community

3

MES 245Introduction to Middle Eastern Studies

3

POL 266Politics and Culture

3

POL 220Russia Today

3

WST 220Introduction to Women's Studies

3

Area VI: Historical Studies (3 credits)

Credits
AAS 245History of African Americans

3

ANT 212Ancient Peoples and Cultures

3

HIS 241Early Modern Europe, 1400-1815

3

HIS 242Contemporary European History

3

HIS 243Foundations of the United States

3

HIS 244Modern United States History

3

HIS 246Civilizations of the Ancient World

3

HIS 247Medieval Civilization

3

HIS 250Understanding History

3

LAC 266Introduction to Latin America and the Caribbean I

3

LAC 267Introduction to Latin America and the Caribbean II

3

POL 241Globalization

3

HIU 348History of New York: City and State

3

HIU 348: Fulfills Area VI requirement for HIS majors in the ECCE certification sequence

Area VII: Knowledge, Self, and Values (3 credits)

Credits
AAS 269Introduction to African Philosophy

3

ACU 266Classical Myth and the Human Condition

3

AMS 111American Culture-Value and Traditions

3

AAS 269Introduction to African Philosophy

3

PHI 169Critical Reasoning

3

PHI 170Introduction to Logic

3

PHI 171Problems of Philosophy

3

PHI 172Contemporary Moral Issues

3

PHI 173Justice and Society

3

PHI 174Theories of Human Nature

3

PHI 175Philosophy of Religion

3

PHI 177Philosophy of Contemporary Music

3

POL 172Great Political Thinkers

3

Writing-Intensive Course Requirements

Students must complete four courses designated as writing-intensive, three prior to earning the 60th credit and one following. Individual sections of courses will be designated as writing-intensive, and students may take writing-intensive sections of courses in General Education, major, minor, and elective courses.

Upper-Division Interdisciplinary General Education Requirement (6 Credits)

After earning a minimum of 60 credits or an Associate's Degree, and officially selecting a major, all students must complete two LEH courses.

The two are to be chosen in topics outside their major from four of the following five variable topics courses:

Credits
LEH 351Studies in Scientific and Applied Perspectives

3

LEH 352Studies in Literature

3

LEH 353Studies in the Arts

3

LEH 354Studies in Historical Studies

3

LEH 355Studies in Philosophy, Theory and Abstract Thinking

3

Students who took LEH 100, LEH 101, or LEH 110 prior to Fall 2008 may substitute this course for one of the LEH 351-LEH 355 requirements.

Each semester, a series of topics for these courses will be announced in the Schedule of Classes.

Credits
LEH 100The Liberal Arts: Freshman Seminar

3

LEH 300Studies in the Humanities and the Social Sciences

3

LEH 301Studies in the Humanities and the Social Sciences

3

LEH 351Studies in Scientific and Applied Perspectives

3

LEH 352Studies in Literature

3

LEH 353Studies in the Arts

3

LEH 354Studies in Historical Studies

3

LEH 355Studies in Philosophy, Theory and Abstract Thinking

3

Majors and Minors

Major Field Requirement

All candidates for a baccalaureate degree must select a major field of study and complete all requirements for that major.

Each department, departmental section, or interdisciplinary program at the College is responsible for determining the content and requirements of the majors it offers. The requirements for each major are listed under the alphabetical listings of departments in this Bulletin. Students must select a major by the time they have earned 60 college credits and must record their choices in the Office of the Registrar (Shuster Hall, Room 106). Students are advised to consult with prospective departments about a major as soon as possible.

Restrictions for the B.A. degree: No more than 42 credits may be required within one department. No more than 64 credits may be required as a major.

Restrictions for the B.S. and B.F.A. degrees: No more than 64 credits may be required within one department. No more than 85 credits may be required as a major.

Note: Students may take no more than 60 credits in any one department. 

Double Majors

To graduate with a double major, a student must fulfill the requirements for both majors and must earn at least 24 discrete credits in each major field, i.e., none of the 24 credits applied toward one major shall be applied toward the other major.

Minor Requirement (12 Credits or more credits)

A minor, which normally consists of at twelve credits of related courses beyond the 100 level in a department or approved program (including professional programs, such as teacher education), is not required for graduation (except as may be required for a specific major). Students may nonetheless declare a minor field of concentration, which will become part of their official program. Normally, at least six of the twelve credits must be taken in 300- and 400-level courses. Students who wish to do so should declare their minor by the time they have earned 80 credits and must record their choices in the Office of the Registrar (Shuster Hall, Room 108).

With the approval of an appropriate adviser, students may construct their own minor from related courses offered by two or more departments. Instructions on how to declare a minor requirement are available from the Academic Information and Advisement Center (Shuster Hall, Room 280).